Common Halloween Candies Your Dentist Despises

It won’t be long before your little one goes door to door in quest for a bucketful of candies. As you sort through the trick-or-treating aftermath, here’s the 411 on candies we discourage, and why. You’ll want to pick these out to donate or give away at the office. If the little ones are allowed a day to indulge, they really should brush before bed, especially after having the following ubiquitous treats:

Sticky Candy

As MouthHealthy advises, “Be picky if it’s sticky.” Sticky and gummy candies are harder to remove and could result in cavity-causing bacteria staying on the kids’ teeth longer. Common candies that fall in this category include:

  • Snickers (27 grams of sugar in 1 bar)
  • Candy Corn (32 grams of sugar in 1 handful)
  • Tootsie Rolls (23 grams of sugar in 6 rolls)
  • Starburst (22 grams of sugar in 9 pieces)

Hard Candy

Kids tend to keep hard candies in their mouth longer, which results in prolonged exposure to sugar. In addition, hard candy can break the teeth when kids bite down on it. A common hard candy found in the Halloween bag includes Jawbreakers, which, according to DentalProductsReport.com, “give bacteria an all-access pass to the 36 grams of sugar in each half-inch candy.”

Sour Candy

Acidic sour candy weakens tooth enamel. As written in our blog post,The Eroding Effects of Sour Candy on Kids’ Teeth, marketing companies target ads for sour candy directly toward children. Sour candies encourage kids with “extreme,” intensifying flavors, and their growing popularity has contributed to the prevalence of dental erosion in recent years.

Examples of sour candies include:

  • Sour Patch Kids (36 grams of sugar in a 2-ounce bag)
  • Air Heads Extremes (32 grams of sugar in 1 pack)
  • Sour Punch (18 grams of sugar per serving)

More Halloween tips and tricks:

7 Halloween Safety Tips
7 Personalized Halloween Treat Bags
5 Tips to Avoid Halloween Candy Overload

 

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